Archive for category Adventures

Thar Yonder Lich King

So my guild got the Lich King down last Friday.

I’d like to think this was a significant raiding accomplishment that finally gives me the ability to call myself a real raider. We worked hard on it and our victory was unquestionable – ironically, much more so than our victory over Sindragosa, who we barely got down in an arduous fight that I’m not entirely sure we could repeat, at least not without a lot of wipes and heartache. If I were to make up an RP history of our guild’s achievements, Sindragosa would be a Pyrrhic victory, leaving a battered, weakened party standing over the slain Frostwyrm’s bones. One of us didn’t walk away at all. Much of our difficulty in getting down Arthas, in fact, stemmed from our troubles replacing the raider we’d lost. In a way, though, this only made the victory sweeter. Our rebuilt raid is, if anything, stronger than ever.

Throughout the fight, though, I couldn’t help but feel the whole thing could have been done… better. I’m thinking about this from a storytelling perspective here. The fight mechanics were interesting and challenging and I don’t really have any complaint with them, but the story…

They had a lot to work with, here. There’s an awful lot of backstory and loose ends relating to the Lich King, from Arthas’ own history to the Ebon Blade to the Forsaken to Wrathgate, and I feel like very few of them got any closure. Terenas Menethil put in his appearance and that was kind of neat, but other than that, it was just fight mechanics that were fun but meaningless to the story, and then WOO TEH LITE SAVES, PRAISE TEH LITE. Oh, and Bolvar.

To me, the capture of Bolvar (and Saurfang the Younger) was much less interesting than the other result of Wrathgate – The Lich King was infected with the freaking New Plague! He was clearly affected by it, and it pissed him off. What did this mean? What would it do to him? This was the burning question I had when the Wrathgate cinematic ended, and I was hoping it would be addressed later. Unfortunately, it wasn’t. Apparently he shrugged it off because he’s just that awesome. Me, I’d rather pretend that the Necrotic Plague was actually the New Plague, which the still-infected Arthas was spreading willy-nilly amongst his enemies and his own followers. It almost makes sense – a few tweaks to the way it behaved and a change of the disease’s name and it would have turned a random boss mechanic into Chekhov’s Plague.

So sans New Plague, it’s the power of the Light, wielded by Tirion Fordring, that defeats the Lich King. I feel like Fordring was one of the characters who least deserved to be in that scene – he had no history with Arthas, no vengeance to wreak or answers to seek. All he had to offer, plot-wise, was a lecture about what a bad boy the Lich King had been. Painfully conspicuous in their absence were Darion Mograine and especially Sylvanas Windrunner. Long before there was even a World of Warcraft it seemed like Blizzard’s writers were building up to a bloody revenge upon the Lich King at the hands of Sylvanas. It’s been a comeuppance years in the making, and when its time finally arrived, she was unceremoniously ignored in favor of two paladins blathering about duty. Like we couldn’t just walk into any one of a half-dozen Argent Crusade camps and get an earful of such talk without having to slay a Lich King first.

Speaking of Bolvar: the man irritates me greatly. Isn’t this the same Bolvar who let Onyxia lead him around by the nose (or something, anyway) for years while Stormwind crumbled from within? He really doesn’t seem so strong-willed or incorruptible in light of that history. Oh, and if you’re Horde (which I am) he’s also a general for a country you’re currently at war with. But he’s a paladin, so of course we all trust him to assume power over an unstoppable army and then willingly isolate himself for all eternity. I’m hoping that, come Cat, we see a sub-faction or two of Scourge break away from Bolvar’s mastery in the same way that Sylvanas broke away from the original Lich King. Perhaps led by a Crypt Lord or Frostwyrm? It seems like when I see Frostwyrms they’re at best lackeys, or at worst treated like dumb beasts. They’re supposed to be quite intelligent and it’d be refreshing to actually see one in a position of authority. As for Crypt Lords, well, I just think they’re awesome and could use more screen time.

In my opinion, though, the biggest loose end that was completely ignored is that “original Lich King,” by which of course I mean Ner’zhul. This was the orc that started it all – all the Warcraft games, the destruction of Draenor, the damnation AND the salvation of the orcs, the Burning Legion’s reintroduction to Azeroth – all of it. His story was long and tragic and deserved a much better ending than the inexplicable subsuming of his soul by a demonstrably weak-willed prince who he’d already established domination over. Arthas himself was a reasonably interesting character, but he was no Ner’zhul. Either one of them was more interesting than what we got in Wrath of the Lich King when Blizzard’s writers decided to mash the two characters into one, utterly destroying one of the most complex evil-mastermind-and-Dragon pairs in any video game and replacing them with a single two-dimensional Sauron wannabe. I wasn’t really expecting them to undo damage of this scale, but I was hoping they could at least acknowledge Ner’zhul’s existence, right there before the end. No such luck.

All in all, a lot of missed opportunities for some really nice storytelling. Damn, I’m really sad about Ner’zhul. It ain’t easy being a Lore buff.

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Being Flexible

I wasn’t expecting to make this my first post, but it happened to me recently and I wanted to write about it while it was fresh on my mind.

I’ve been participating in a regular semi-pugged ICC25 for the last few weeks. None of the healers were raid assists and none of them seemed to be assuming any sort of leadership position, so previously I’d glyphed Rapid Rejuvenation and just healed willy-nilly as I’m wont to do in such circumstances, and it worked out all right, but this week I decided to see if I could get a bit more organization. Since I was just a pugger and there were others around with more history with this group, I went about it circumspectly, by asking if we were doing healing assignments. Unsurprisingly, most of them had classified themselves into a particular role based on their class. Since we only had one healadin that left us short on tank healers, so I dedicated myself to tank healing.

One healer, however, resisted the idea of healing assignments completely. “I just heal the raid and help with the tanks,” he said.

“I like that plan,” someone else chimed in.

The response: “It’s always my plan.”

Now, I don’t have a problem with the free-for-all healing approach where no one has any assignments. I don’t think it’s ideal with groups that don’t know each other well (which we didn’t), and in fact think most groups will benefit from, at the least, sorting out who’s healing tanks and who’s healing the raid. But if that’s the way a group wants to do it, fine.  My issue here comes from his arrogance and inflexibility.

While everyone else was delineating a role for themselves, he refused to do so. Since he got support from one of the other healers (and I wasn’t really in charge anyway) I let it slide, but it wasn’t the attitude of a team player. He had his favorite way of doing things and he was going to stick to it regardless. Worse, he seemed proud of using his “plan” in every situation. Because clearly just because someone thinks your plan is good in one situation, it must be good in all of them.  I’m honestly rather annoyed with the other healer for treating this “idea” as something special, when really it’s something you should be doing nearly all the time. Healing assignments tell you where you should focus, they don’t put limits on who you can (or should) heal. Helping out both the raid and the tanks should be the default regardless of assignment.

Anyway: If you can’t change tactics, you’re a fail healer, pure and simple.

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